hírolvasó

Was Microsoft Forced To Pay $136M In Back Taxes In China?

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 20:42
itwbennett writes China's state-controlled Xinhua News Agency said on Sunday that an unnamed international company was forced to pay 840 million yuan ($136 million) in back taxes, as part of a Chinese government crackdown on tax evasion. The Xinhua article simply referred to it as the "M company," describing it as a top 500 global firm headquartered in the U.S. that in 1995 set up a wholly owned foreign subsidiary in Beijing. The details match Microsoft's own background, and no other company obviously fits the bill. Xinhua added, that despite the company's strengths, its subsidiary in China had not been not making a profit, and posted a loss of over $2 billion during a six-year period.

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Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Clarificiation on the IP Address Security in Dropbox Case

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 19:59
Bennett Haselton writes A judge rules that a county has to turn over the IP addresses that were used to access a county mayor's Dropbox account, stating that there is no valid security-related reason why the IP addresses should be exempt from a public records request. I think the judge's conclusion about IP addresses was right, but the reasoning was flawed; here is a technically more correct argument that would have led to the same answer. Keep Reading to see what Bennett has to say about the case.

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Kategóriák: Napi hírek

2014: Year of open source miracles

LinuxToday - sze, 2014-11-26 19:45
Kategóriák: Linux

WaveNET – the Floating, Flexible Wave Energy Generator

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 19:15
Zothecula writes: Scotland's Albatern is putting a new, modular spin on renewable energy generation. WaveNET is a scalable array of floating "Squid" generator units that harvest wave energy as their buoyant arms rise and fall with the motion of the waves. Each Squid can link up to as many as three others, effectively creating a large, floating grid that's flexible in every direction. The bigger this grid gets, the more efficient it becomes at harvesting energy, and the more different wave movements it can extract energy from. Albatern's 10-year target is to have 1.25 kilometer-long floating energy farms pumping out as much as 100 megawatts by 2024.

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Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Iroda takarítás során talált alkatrészek / kiegészítők / egyéb dolgaimat eladnám AKCIÓS! áron

HUP adás-vétel - sze, 2014-11-26 19:04

Sziasztok!

A héten úgy adódott , hogy volt 3 szabad munkamentes napom (nagyon ritka dolog:) ) amikor is összeszedtem azokat a dolgokat az irodámban , amiket már pár hónapja csak pakolászok egyik sarokból a másikba és gyakorlatilag már semmire nem fogom felhasználni , vagyis csak a helyet foglalják.

Ezek a dolgok mind működőképesek , használtak , vagy újak , adott dolgok hiányosak , de ez természetesen a termék leírásában fel van tüntetve.

Garancia szempontjából általában 1 hetet , vagy 1 hónapot vállalok , értéktől függően.

Igyekeztem olyan árakat meghatározni , amely árakkal én sem járok rosszul de nektek is megéri.

Természetesen vaterán kívül is megegyezhetünk , és így valamivel olcsóbban tudom adni az adott terméket.

Ezen a címen megtalálhatjátok összegyűjtve az összes terméket , leírással , képekkel, minden lényeges információval.

http://www.vatera.hu/listings/index.php?us=gegyur87

Remélem nem sértettem szabályzatot ezzel , hogy kiraktam a vaterára mutató linket , de ha igen , akkor csak kiírom az eladó termékek listáját egyszerűen listűba foglalva.

Mapping the world with open source (Opensource.com)

Linux Weekly News - sze, 2014-11-26 18:45
Opensource.com talks with Paul Ramsey, senior strategist at the open source company Boundless. "Boundless is the “Red Hat of geospatial”, which says a bit about our business model, but doesn’t really explain our technology. GIS professionals and IT professionals (and, really, anyone with a custom mapping problem) use our tools to store their data, in a spatial SQL database (PostGIS), publish maps and data over the web (GeoServer), and view or edit data in web browsers (OpenLayers) or on the desktop (QGIS). Basically, our tools let developers build web applications that understand and can attractively visualize location. We help people take spatial data out of the GIS department and use it to improve workflows and make decisions anywhere in the organization. This is part of what we see as a move towards what we call Spatial IT, where spatial data is used to empower decision-making across an enterprise."
Kategóriák: Linux

Auto Industry Teams Up With Military To Stop Car Hacking

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 18:32
An anonymous reader writes: A team of hackers is collaborating with military and industry groups to develop cyber security defenses for commercially available cars, in response to a growing threat from criminals and terrorists. In the U.K., hackers are now responsible for a third of car thefts in London and there are fears that while technology is progressing, older models will remain vulnerable to attack. Although there have been no reported instances of a car being completely commandeered outside of controlled conditions, during tests hackers come out on top every time – unlocking car boots, setting off windscreen wipers, locking brakes, and cutting the engine.

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Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Security advisories for Wednesday

Linux Weekly News - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50

Debian has updated wireshark (multiple vulnerabilities).

Mageia has updated clamav (two vulnerabilities) and perl-Plack (information disclosure).

Mandriva has updated libvncserver (multiple vulnerabilities) and phpmyadmin (multiple vulnerabilities).

openSUSE has updated rubygem-sprockets-2_1 (directory traversal), rubygem-sprockets-2_2 (directory traversal), and wireshark (multiple vulnerabilities).

Red Hat has updated RHOSE (two vulnerabilities).

Ubuntu has updated squid3 (14.10, 14.04: denial of service).

Kategóriák: Linux

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek

Hacker Threatened With 44 Felony Charges Escapes With Misdemeanor

Slashdot - sze, 2014-11-26 17:50
An anonymous reader writes: It's no secret that prosecutors usually throw every charge they can at an alleged criminal, but the case of Aaron Swartz brought to light how poorly-written computer abuse laws lend themselves to this practice. Now, another perfect example has resolved itself: a hacker with ties to Anonymous was recently threatened with 44 felony counts of computer fraud and cyberstalking, each with its own 10-year maximum sentence. If the charges stuck, the man was facing multiple lifetimes worth of imprisonment. But, of course, they didn't. Prosecutors struck a deal to get him to plead guilty to a single misdemeanor charge, which carried only a $10,000 fine. The man's attorney, Tor Eklund, said, "The more I looked at this, the more it seemed like an archetypal example of the Department of Justice's prosecutorial abuse when it comes to computer crime. It shows how aggressive they are, and how they seek to destroy your reputation in the press even when the charges are complete, fricking garbage."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Kategóriák: Napi hírek